Outside Inside:
Japanese Woodcut Prints and Sculptures by Paul Furneaux
2011-2015

Paul Furneaux

Exhibition Dates: 23 October -13 November 2015

William Road Gallery,
7-9 William Road
London
NW1 3ER
(nearest underground station is Euston Square)

Open: Mon-Sat 10-6pm Closed Sundays.
Tel: 020 7313 6000

Paul Furneaux
Born Ellon N.E. Scotland.

Studied: Drawing and painting Edinburgh College of art 1982-87 BA(Hons) Post Graduate (Distinction)
Tama Art University Tokyo 1996-2000 Masters course in Mokuhanga (Japanese woodcut printing).

‘I had a studio for ten years in the Cowgate, part of Edinburgh’s old town and a UNESCO heritage area.
During that period I taught part-time at Edinburgh College of Art but eventually moved to Tokyo where I took up a place at Tama Art University on the masters course studying traditional and contemporary techniques in Japanese woodcut printing.

I was awarded the prestigious Monbusho Japanese government scholarship from 1996-2000 and with this support was able to complete my studies and returned the same year taking up a post as artist in residence at the Royal Museum of Scotland as part of the nation wide year of the artist programme. 2001

My time in the Cowgate came to an end when my studio burned down during the fire there which engulfed around 20 buildings. Fortunately and over time I have been able to relocate in Stockbridge at the WASPS Patriothall studios where I have now been for about ten years.

The main focus of my work continues to be in the area of Mokuhanga (the Japanese term for woodcut print).
Essentially I use the same ancient techniques of cutting wood with a variety of cutting knifes and gouges .The wood is then dampened, watercolor is applied to the cut wood with specialist printing brushes and using Japanese paper the image is printed by hand with the aid of a baren (saucer sized disc wrapped in bamboo leaf or with modern equivalent of ballbairings)

I have managed to exhibit my works nationally and internationally taking up several residencies and developed some of the prints to wrap around found and made sculptural objects. My most recent works have a pared-down visual language, which highlights the inherent beauty of my chosen medium .The particular choice of support has given the works not only a character of their own, but also a dimension which can further be explored-a shifting passage between the pictorial and physical space.

This Autumn I will be exhibiting a solo exhibition in London for the first time since my first studio was destroyed.’

Outside: Inside A contemporary use of Japanese woodcut printing by SSA Professional Member, Paul Furneaux RSA.

 

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