Derek Dick

Website: http://www.notawordart.com

Email: notawordart@gmail.com

Click on a thumbnail image above to enlarge.



The Tailor, Pencil drawing on tissue paper pasted on to distressed plywood, 66.5cm x 91cm

The Entertainer, Pencil drawing on tissue paper pasted on to distressed plywood, 66.5cm x 97.5cm

The Gardener, Pencil drawing on tissue paper pasted on to distressed plywood, 66.5cm x 91cm

The Artist, Pencil drawing on tissue paper pasted on to distressed plywood, 66.5cm x 95.5cm


Statement

My artwork, often taken from my street photography that captures chance encounters and random incidents, are detailed pencil studies drawn on to archival tissue paper using a 0.2 pilot pencil. Rips and tears in the paper are inevitable and also unpredictable thus creating a balance between tradition and expression, order and chaos.

These drawings and photographs are pasted onto backboards including distressed plywood, discarded timber and old frames. This process is like weaving with spiders webs, creating an additional risk of damage or even total loss of the work. Working this way allows the medium a level of control on how the finished work will look thus creating an element of chance to the outcome.

The rationale for this approach is to represent the unpredictability of memory and how this can be distorted and shaped by the viewers’ own experiences. Through this approach to my drawing and street photography I documents a single moment in time; one line in a story that has no beginning or end and invites his audience to fill in the gaps. These potentially uncontrollable gaps exemplify the fragility of history and how the past can be individually reinterpreted.


Biography

I have worked in an arts, culture and education environment since graduating with a BA (Hons) Fine Art in 1986. As a practicing artist I have had studios across the North of England.

I have taught in schools, colleges and universities before becoming a curator and exhibition designer working at a number of museums and galleries including Tate. As a contemporary curator I saw my role as more than just a custodian of collections but as a catalyst for developing and encouraging dialogue between the past and present. By creating these non-verbal conversations I became an intermediary between several diverse groups of people and created discussions that bridged gaps and removed barriers.

In 2017 I made the decision to refocus my career and now, returning as NotaWord, I have produced a new body of work representing memories and how chance, risk, uncertainty and also discovery can be influential in how we interpret the past.